Shared Differences

In so many ways, the fixture at the Camp Nou last night went according to plan on many levels. Barcelona dominated possession but created very little. Real Madrid were content to defend before counter attacking quickly, utilising space on the flanks exploiting Barcelona weaknesses during transitions.

Did we learn anything new?

Yes, and no.

For the game raises more questions than it manages to answer for both sides.

In their last five visits to the Camp Nou , Madrid has an impressive record of one win, one defeat and three draws. Mourinho made a mistake in his first visit to the Camp Nou with Real Madrid, believing his team to be the equal of Barcelona in terms of the production of a stylish possession based performance. He suffered heavily for such a belief. The 5-0 defeat remains Mourinho’s biggest loss as a manager. Since then, the tactical plan has been more conservative, more pragmatic. With each passing clasico the perceived gap between the sides, never as significant as many claimed, has narrowed. Tactical plans were hatched and repeatedly tweaked as Mourinho sought the perfect gameplan. Sometimes Madrid would press high; sometimes they adopted a low block.

Last night’s result is not the outcome of a few ideas hastily cobbled together on the training ground this week. It is the result of considerable thought, hard work and ultimately, trial and error, sometimes costly error for Madrid on the pitch. But the recent results at the Camp Nou demonstrate that Madrid is now consistently achieving results against Barcelona .

The inability of Barcelona to break down disciplined, organised, defensive teams employing a low block in key games has been highlighted before but Milan and now Madrid have not parked the bus. Far from it. They have controlled space and prevented Barcelona having shooting opportunities. There was no luck involved in either victory.

Leaving aside the issues surrounding team selection etc for Barcelona , there is something more fundamental to address. Why does Barcelona inevitably seek to attack even when there is no compulsion to do so? The tactical alteration to include an additional midfielder was designed to give control first and foremost. Why does FCB eschew that control by pursuing victory? There was no requirement for Barcelona to push forward or attack with such vigour as they did in the early stages last night before being undone by a typically swift and lethal Madrid counter.

When exploring the present tactical issues, there are two which need consideration. Firstly, the current Blaugrana attack lacks vertical penetration. The inclusion of Cesc Fabregas at the expense of an attacker and the propensity for Messi to drop deeper has eroded the dynamics of the attack. A cutting edge has been traded for greater control through possession. This has incresingly become sterile domination. Secondly, the attacking thrust of Alba allied to Alves leaves Barcelona vulnerable on attack / defence transitions. The left side in particular is weak. Milan exploited this as did Madrid last night

And yet if the victory of Madrid at the Camp Nou last night highlighted the inadequacies of Barcelona sharply, what does it say of Madrid in the process? What if the roles were reversed? Could los blancos have broken down their rivals?

The victory at the Camp Nou must not be allowed to conveniently conceal the issues presently existing within the Real Madrid side.This is the same Madrid side which performed so abjectly as they crashed 1-0 away to Granada just under four weeks ago. A Madrid side that has also lost away to Getafe , Real Betis, Sevilla and Malaga. A Madrid side that finds it difficult to break down disciplined, organised, defensive teams employing a low block who allow Madrid to set the tempo of the game and take the initiative.
The question for Madrid is not how to face up to Barcelona anymore. The question is now how Madrid should tackle lesser sides such as Granada . Sides who adopt the very same approach that Madrid use against Barcelona albeit with less talented players but more of a collective focus. The game plan which Madrid uses to such effect against Barcelona is broadly the same plan which undermines them.

And whilst possession is so necessary for Barcelona , for Madrid the opposite is true, the side don’t require possession to win their games. Indeed there is an argument that Madrid are closer to Simeone’s Atleti team who maintain their shape above all else forgoing possession in the process. Madrid is at their most dangerous without the ball, awaiting an error by their opponent to exploit. Is there a better counter attacking side in world football? What other team can take an opposition corner, a potential weakness, and transform that into a strength?
For as diametrically opposed as their present footballing philosophies may be, the clash of proactive and reactive football, there is shared ground between both sides when it comes to their Achilles heel.

Both sides struggle when faced with deep lying and organised defences for differing reasons. Whilst Barcelona seeks to weave passing patterns around their opponents, they are easily crowded out. Madrid , meanwhile, look to utilise their pace and power during fast transitions but struggle to construct meaningful possession. Both sides need space to break toward, to offer dynamism, offer opportunities and above all, to create.

Whilst Mourinho is happy to vary his tactics, to allow pragmatism to reign supreme and always focus on the result ahead of the performance, the reverse is true, to a degree, in Barcelona where the performance matters just as much as the result. Where, as Cryuff stated, “there is no greater prize than being acclaimed for your style”. This is not an idealistic dream however, for Barcelona believes that their style of football presents them with the greatest opportunity of winning. They style is still a means to an end.

If Barcelona perform yet succumb to defeat, they can cling to their belief in still adhering to their philosophy of delivering stylish, aesthetically pleasing football. If the present Real Madrid side fall there is a vacuum built around Mourinho’s mantra that he is a winner above all else. When he fails to win, there is no fallback position.
In football, it is always easier to destroy than it is to create. Barcelona has found that out often in the recent past. It may be Madrid ’s turn to discover it next week at Old Trafford.

Advertisements

One Response to Shared Differences

  1. Crucifuck says:

    really interesting blog, keep it up

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: